2018 Writers’ League of Texas Conference

Earlier this month was the annual Writers’ League of Texas Agents and Editors Conference in Austin, TX. Below is a picture of my badge as well as a nice little ribbon (which I will get to in the meat of this blogging remembrance)

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A little backstory first: I moved to Texas a couple of years ago when my lovely wife got a job offer she couldn’t turn down in the great city of Austin (seriously, it is a sweet ass city with lots to do, but good gracious, it is hot as sin down here, and being from Chicago, I was not prepared for this temperature change…). Anyway, I had started writing what would become a series called The Mistlands Tragedies many years ago (of which if you follow this blog, you’ve seen the many changes it has undergone), but it wasn’t until we moved to Texas that I really found the push I needed.

You see, up until I moved to Texas, I was a man alone with this writing thing, no fellow writers, no critique partners, no one but my brain and my fingers to work with. And then I found the WLT. Now the WLT is simply amazing for bringing writers together and creating that community. I won’t bore you with all the rah-rah-rah stuff or the bloody tears of joy (wait, what? jk!) but the best thing is, each year, the WLT has a conference where honest-to-goodness professional book industry peeps show up and listen to us writers ramble about their stories!!!

I went last year and, as my first ever writers’ conference experience, I would say it was a smashing success. I gained experience and knowledge I never would have on my own. I met a great writing friend, Amanda, and just had a great time overall.

This year, while still great, was a different experience for me, and most of that comes down to where I am as a writer this year as opposed to last.

First, the ribbon at the bottom of my badge. So each year, the WLT has a manuscript contest. You submit the first ten pages of your MS and a synopsis. Then the WLT has panels of judges based on the category you submit to (mine was Science Fiction/Fantasy, obvi). Then these judges will read each submission and then come up with a list of finalists and a winner. Then we all get recognized at the conference for our awesome work!

So I’ll be frank: I wasn’t expecting anything from the contest. Last year I submitted and obviously didn’t get anything. This year, I was in the midst of drastic rewrites/editing of what is now the first book in the Tragedies. I was still working through things, but my overall plot was plotted, the characters characterized and vibe the vibing (I don’t think that’s how it is spelled, but I’m going with it). I submitted the first ten pages, which I had polished so many times it shone like newly shined black Sunday Church shoes, and the synopsis like a good little follower of rules. And then sent it off to the Gods. Little did I expect I would be named a finalist. I mean, as a writer who has been rejected (rightly so) by many agents in the query trenches, this was like the world had opened anew for me. Like a phoenix rising from the ashes into this Valhalla of bliss. I couldn’t have been more happy or motivated to keep on writing.

But here is the thing, with growth as a writer, you tend to level up (I mean that is the nature of the world) and that also pertained to the WLT conference.

Last year, I learned a ton from the panels offered by the conference, this year, very little. I’m not here to say the panels this year were worthless, but more to say that I am past the 101 class level of the book industry, past the very basic overview of things, past the cursory ideas tossed out there. I’ve been querying for ages now. I know how to structure a query letter or synopsis (not saying I’m great at either, but I know what needs to go in them). I know the basics of what happens with an agent, with an editor, with a publisher. I’ve either been to those panels before, or have done extensive research on my own.

The panels this year were very similar (if not the exact same in some cases) to the ones last year. And for newbie writers, those things are great. But for me, I needed more detail, more in depth discussions on craft and business. I needed more knowledge from the agents/editors, and unfortunately, I didn’t get that very much this year. I’m at that point where I feel my story is so nearly polished (per my critique partners) that I’m nearing the point of no return with agents. If I do the query right, I should be getting some hits. So I need some 400 level courses and panels about the industry AFTER the query process. And the conference didn’t have those available (minus a good portion of the book contract panel, which was quite eye-opening).

One thing I also want to touch on is the agent pitch. I talked about the pitching in my post about the DFWCon I went to last month, and, at the WLT conference, I also had a pitch session. I had a glowing response to my pitches at DFWCon and the WLT was not as glowing to very nearly the same exact pitch. But here is the thing, all the agents said to query them (which is the great thing, better to get requests from a conference than to try the slushpile), but getting to that point of them telling me to submit was markedely different between them all. Now, that is no knock toward the agents from either conference, but I do think it adequately sums up the industry: THIS STUFF IS SUBJECTIVE AS HELL!!!! Not every agent (and more importantly, readers) will be interested in the same stuff, even in their preferred genre! And that is perfectly acceptable. Yes, it’s weird when it happens in person (in that microcosm of the 10 minute pitch session where you are trying to sell your story to a very important person), as opposed to anonymous email queries, but it is a great learning experience nonetheless.

Even if the panels were a bit lower level than I would have liked, and my pitch session was not as strong as I would have wanted it to be, the conference on the whole was still a good experience. I got to spend time with others like me, introverts working on stories that are near and dear to their hearts (although, I seriously got tired of hearing people say they are writing memoir – but that is just not my particular brand of whiskey). I got to spend the entire weekend talking/plotting/idea generating/shooting the shit with my good buddy (and critique partner) Dewey.

And I think that is the most important thing to take away from conferences: it is all about the writing journey, and take those with you that are also on the same quest!

What I’ve Read: Stormdancer

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Stormdancer by Jay Kristoff

Brief Summary:

In a world based off of feudal Japan and mixed with the steampunk vibe, the child of the Shogun’s greatest hunter embarks on a journey to find a fabled “thunder tiger” on the whim of said Shogun. As the hunters track down the thunder tiger, it attacks their airship and causes it to crash, but that is only after the father slices off the griffin’s wings, rendering it unable to fly. Now, the heroine, Yukiko, has a gift where she can meld minds with animals. As the ship is crashing, she mind melds with the griffin and they save each other from death (even though the thunder tiger hates her). Because this world is based on honor, the hunter faces death for losing the thunder tiger, as well as rogue ronin are attempting to overthrow the Shogun. And lest we forget, there are the Guildsmen, the purveyors of the source of power in this world have their own schemes.

What works:

Buruu the thunder tiger is awesome. Mr. Kristoff created this wonderful mythical creature that is not only deep, but also very humorous. Yukiko and Buruu’s connection is really a joy to read and Buruu is very witty for an “animal.” I really enjoyed reading their growth and reliance on one another to survive. It was organic and natural, but also had that layer of respect to each other. I dig it.

I loved the Japanese steampunk world Mr. Kristoff created. Sure, I don’t know enough about Japanese culture (and many internet trolls say that of the author…), but it wasn’t overtly jarring to read. Yeah, some of the terms needed to be Googled (thankfully there is also a dictionary in the back of the book of Japanese terms), but I thought it was cohesive enough, and detailed enough to get a true understanding of the world. I liked the Mr. Kristoff went all out with his Japanese world, using terms, clothing, myths, legends, titles. I like seeing something different like that. Really made the story stronger.

I really enjoyed the vibe given from the chi (the source of power), as it is both energizing the world, but also used as a drug. Very cool stuff. I definitely loved the Guildsmen. These people wear suits of metal (called their skin) and are basically robots. I thought it was a cool idea to have the character of Kin learn his history isn’t exactly the correct path.

The writing is very fast-paced (a staple of Kristoff’s) and easy to read. The action was action-y and the dialogue neat. Though there were some flow-y prose in certain points of the story, but I enjoy that (I know others might not)

But the best thing is obviously Yukiko. I love me some hardnosed badass chicas. Yukiko has a temper, but also grounded in every which way. She’s smart, witty, loyal, and overall, just a fun character. Obviously her connection with Buruu is amazing, but I also found her connection (or early lack-there-of) with her father to be a true reflection of the setting and the world they inhabit. It started as one thing and then ended completely different, far away from what I would have expected to see. Very well done.

What doesn’t work:

Personal preference alert: I hate hate hate hate hate hate 3rd person omniscient POV. I just can’t do it. I dislike going back and forth between characters in consecutive paragraphs. I much prefer a set POV for each scene. Granted, Mr. Kristoff did a great job of maintaining voice of characters when switching to and from, but I just can’t get into it.

Even though this is Adult with YA crossover, one thing I really didn’t like was the “green-eyed samurai” love interest for Yukiko. It felt shoehorned into the story and I could have done without it, or at least made it a slower burn.

One thing I can also agree with some of the other reviews out there is that it takes quite a long time to get the story off the ground. It takes about 100 pages before we meet the thunder tiger. Now I understand the need to set the story up, but I think some of the earlier chapters could have been tightened to get to the best part of the story and that is Yukiko and Buruu.

Rating:

4 out of 5

Meeting a Role Model

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Good God, yes that is me meeting the great Terry Brooks! (squuuuuuueeeeeeee)

Let me explain this total fanboy behavior. When I was twelve years old, my preteen brain was just getting into reading for enjoyment. My parents are huge readers (I mean like a book or two a week) and I’m a product of nurture. My middle school also had a program called Accelerated Reader where if you read books, you got points based on the reading level, and those points added up to buy useless toys and knick-knacks (you know, useless shit that kids want – Pogs were big back then and we could buy frickin’ Pogs!!!), not to mention we got pizza parties too from it! But for someone like me, addicted to books via the reading blood coursing through my veins, my reading level was much higher than someone of my age normally would be and this is where I was introduced to two authors that forever changed my life: Richard Adams’ Watership Down & Terry Brooks The Sword of Shannara.

I’ve always been drawn to science fiction and fantasy movies and tv shows (shit, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles adorned everything in my room that wasn’t Ghostbusters…), so naturally I preferred this type of story. I hadn’t yet read Lord of the Rings (only read The Hobbit at that point), but I latched onto Shannara with the deathlike grip of the Skull Bearers. I devoured his books (he had just finished the Heritage of Shannara series and about to launch the impeccable Voyage of Jerle Shannara series) and this led me to find LotR and others as I aged into high school. His books were the launching pad of my love for fantasy stories.

But not only was Mr. Brooks responsible for my reading genre love, he also gave me the nudge of writing. I hate math, I won’t lie. I suck at math like there is no tomorrow. Hell, even though I’m good at science (and studied archaeology) and actually work in the scientific field, I really didn’t enjoy it like I did with English and Literature. I remember in my senior year English class, we had to write our own Canterbury Tale. I remember diving headlong into it with such gusto that I loved it.

So how does all this relate to Mr. Brooks you ask? Well, I’ll tell you. That Tale I wrote (mimicking the poetic style of the actual Tales) about a knight going on a journey to an unknown land (um hello Druid of Shannara and the Voyage series).

And then when I got to college, I began to craft the basis of what would become my Mistlands world. I began to write more than just a few words (thanks Anthro/Classics majors for making me write 30 page papers like it was life-sustaining…) all while trying to live to the magic Mr. Brooks instilled in me.

I have never gone to a book signing before, but when I heard Mr. Brooks was coming to Austin (at the amazing local Book People!) with his latest book dropping, I knew I had to go. I’ve literally read all his books multiple times and he is just a pure genius in this genre.

But the best part of the night (aside from him being wildly funny and divulging his upcoming plans in terms of his projects, not to mention reading a passage from a new Word & Void novel – more squuuuuueeeeee!) I actually got to spend a few minutes talking about writing with him! He genuinely seemed interested in listening to me ramble. He offered me some sage-like advice of keep going and work with writing partners. As well as mentioning that even though we might never make it, to always stay positive and enjoy what you write. And I think that’s the key. This year has got me excited for writing because I’m stoked where my story is, but in the end, I absolutely love this story, and that’s the biggest thing – love what you write! He even said he hoped to see me on a bookshelf one day!

Even though I’m just one of his millions of fans worldwide, he has inspired me from a young age to just enjoy the magic that is in literature!

DFWCon 2018

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On Saturday June 9th I went to the first writer’s conference of the summer – DFWCon in Dallas, TX with my good friend and fellow writer Dewey Conway. Now, as many writers might know, these sort of conferences do a wide range of things for would-be authors – panels by published writers/agents, classes on craft/business, as well as the opportunity to pitch a polished work to an actual agent. This was only my second ever writer’s con, but I’d say this one was a far different experience than my first, and dare I say it, a much better one.

Let’s start simple, this time I actually had a polished work (of which I’ll post future blogs on the many changes Summonborn has gone through in the last six months) that I was feeling positive about being good enough to actually pitch agents. Pitching agents is not an easy task for a fairly introverted person like myself, you know it means talking to another person about something near and dear to your heart. This damned story (ripped tenderly via blood magic from a greater trilogy as a lead-in novel) has gone through so much change, that somewhere along the various rewrites, I realized I had something worth sharing. Now, pitching that same story, regardless of my confidence levels going in, was nothing short of mental pants shitting. I think I did good of keeping it all internal, but it was still nerves going up and down the spine.

But here’s the thing I also learned over many rejections during querying, agents are just looking for the next good story, and they want to listen to your pitch. And if you have a good one, they will be interested. Not so hard.

Luckily, I had an excellent pitch prepared, it was so awesome that when I sat down to pitch, I literally didn’t use it at all… yet somehow I was able to stumble through and form cohesive thoughts long enough to passably get my story across to this lovely agent. And will you believe it, she was interested and wanted me to submit to her. Well Savior’s cock (my main character’s favorite swear word and now in my own lexicon) I knew I had a good story, I just had to make sure I would get it across, and apparently I did. So, that, my dear friends, is a huge win in my book.

It was such a big win for me that I barely cared about the panels/classes. Yeah I went to some, but I really don’t remember a whole lot from them. Cloud Nine is a real feeling I had not been to in a long time. I even decided to try my hand at pitching another agent. It went just as well since she told me to query her agency.

That’s two wins in my book.

And then, to top it off, Dewey pitched his wonderful story and got a full manuscript request! I felt like a proud papa bear because I’ve spent a ton of time with his story as a critique partner, helping him (and vice versa). It felt like I also got  another full request.

Met some other cool writers and heard their pitches. Went to those panels. And then the keynote speak, Mr. Scott Westerfeld, gave an awesome lunchtime speech on Young Adult, teenagers, and art. I really didn’t understand how he was going to tie it all together, but damn was he great. Funny and smart. Oh, and I had some super rich double chocolate cake (which I never eat sweets, but hot damn that was good!)

All in all, it was a great way to kick off the summer! Nothing beats a good roadtrip talking about books. And that is the kicker, for an introverted writer, talking about books IS the easiest way to crack open that shell, I just had to find that first crack.

6 Months on and finally a new Post…

So yeah, I sucked pretty hardcore on my blog the past six months…BUUUUUUT time to rectify it!

I’ve got a ton of updates in terms of this crazy writing journey I am on. I want to break down all that has happened this last six months and how I FINALLY feel like my story Summonborn is solidly polished and fleshed out where agents might actually take notice. Just a teaser, but this is a standalone story to lead into a trilogy and I’ve changed: the setting, the magic system, the climax, and most importantly the heroine’s voice (she’s a sassy spitfire now!).

I also want to dive deeper into the critique partnerships I have and how they have helped me grow as a writer. The most interesting change has come in the craft of my writing and it wouldn’t have happened without these people making me knock down the barriers to success. Also, they are just cool ass people to be associated with!

This month is a pair of writer’s conferences and this year is going to be a much bigger success there. Confidence is at an all-time high. Let’s just say it has to do with Summonborn being in a great place and ready for the show.

I think the last half of the year is going to be pretty good, so much so that I’m looking forward to it!

2017 in Review

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With 2017 ready to bow out and 2018 coming to invade, I think I can honestly say that this past year was a good one.

Personally, and I’ll keep it short since this blog is mostly about my hobbies, was pretty good. The wife and I bought a big dumb house (hooray mortgage) that we pretty much redid (painting really blows). The big dog ended up having heartworms, so yeah, that was fun. While the little one had to get gnarly teeth pulled. Other than spending a metric shit ton of money this year, all in all, it went swimmingly. Oh, and I added to my anime-inspired tattoo sleeve – added Castle in the Sky and Princess Mononoke to my Cowboy Bebop. Next up: Neon Genesis Evangelion.

I’ll leave my writing for the last since that’ll be the longest. In terms of my other hobbies I tend to blog about – I’ve seen/read some badass things this year. From movies to TV shows to books, I can say with aplomb this year was excellent. Now I know that I should have done some more blogs this year about all of the things aforementioned, but sometimes I didn’t want to spoil things (aka The Last Jedi, Stranger Things 2). So I might do a post about them this coming year.

I have a new favorite show: The 100. I seriously don’t know how I missed it until this year, probably the whole YA/CW stigma. But damn, this show is amazing and gets better with each season. One of my other favorite shows, Halt and Catch Fire, ended this year and I am super sadface. I will say that this season was stunning and one character’s death was probably the most well done TV death I have ever seen. Just beautiful. Emotional.

I’d have to say IT was probably the single best movie I saw all year. It (pun intended) was just perfect. It had everything – tension, drama, scares, humor, teenage angst. I just flat out loved it from start to finish. I’ll stand by it, but I loved The Last Jedi (come fight me bro). TLJ really flipped the Star Wars world on its collective head and I loved every minute of it. OK not every minute because that one scene with that one character (we all know what I’m talking about) was very cheesy. And I don’t care if people hate it, I loved it. It’s no Empire, but definitely up there with the best of them. Some of my other top films seen this year were VVitch, Thor: Ragnarok, and Blade Runner 2049.

This year, my goal was to read 30 books. While I didn’t reach that goal, I did finish with a respectable 27.5 (still reading that other half but won’t finish prior to year end). A few of those books were rereads (Elantris, Watership Down, Voyage of Jerle Shannara) but most were brand new. Majority of them were fantasy, but I did dip my toe into YA this year (more on that later). A couple of them are beta reads for critique partners, but I’m counting those because they are full manuscripts. It doesn’t matter if they haven’t been published because someone took the great effort to write them (both were excellent btw). I’d say Blood Song and Nevernight were the top two new books read this year. I will admit, I had to put down three others due to first person POV, I just have such a hard time with 1st person. So hard.

Now to the meat of this year end review – my own writing.

2017 was illuminating for a multitude of reasons. I know I don’t know shit, but I feel like this year really helped clean the muck off so to speak. At the tail end of 2016, I worked with an agent/editor on my passion project. After he lovingly tore it apart, I truly came to understand what the story needed to become – albeit to a point. I spent years writing this thing and in one fell swoop, I learned my story was trite and boring. Overdone. It was disheartening to hear it. But ever the optimist (hey I’m a Chicago Cubs fan so back off) I set my mind to fixing this story of Brynn and Hunter, vengeance v. duty of faith. Long story short, I thought I fixed this story. But I was wrong.

Something just didn’t feel right about it. I changed many things: the setting, the religion, the magic system, points of view. But it still didn’t feel complete. And then I went to my first writer’s conference. Though I grew up in the shadow of Chicago, there really wasn’t a huge writing fellowship, a group of fellow writers. Twitter has really helped grow my world in that manner, but the big thing was moving to Texas. The Writers League of Texas is amazing. I won’t stroke the ego anymore than this, but joining the WLT has been a boon. And their annual conference really helped a ton. I met some great writer friends and had some interesting ideas pop into my head.

You know how they always say you should listen to your wife, well in this case, I should have. Even though she hasn’t read much of my writing (waiting until I’m satisfied with the story) she has always said my style is very YA. So after hearing this and talking about my story at the conference, I came to the revelation it should be YA. I did the edits, toned things down, de-aged the characters, all the fun YA stuff. The story really did pop more. But, I still wasn’t comfortable with it.

I know YA is trending toward more adult themes like sex and violence, but even with toning the story down, it didn’t feel right. I have a creepy sick villain and he had to be taken out in the YA version. That didn’t sit well with me. My main character, Brynn, likes to swear (same with a sky pirate). I didn’t want to lose all of that. But I tried. So I ended up taking the darker parts/characters/plots out and went to put that into a separate book. Nearly finished with that book. But always in the back of my noggin was the original plan for my trilogy. I couldn’t shake it.

And then came the true enlightenment. And it came while playing Final Fantasy IX (of all things).

If you’ve never had the pleasure of playing that game, I highly suggest it. The reason that game inspired me was the whole package it contains – humor, tragedy, tension, rage, friendship, love, idea of self, fast pacing, darkness. I could go on and on, but the bottom line is my story contains all of that. Yes, I tend to write more YA, but the story has to have that darkness to it, that grimness. It has to be dense, fully fleshed out, the world-building has to be adult level. But that doesn’t mean my YA writing can’t fit into that mold. They can co-exist. And then I remembered something that agent/editor said to me – I can write different characters or scenes using different genres. For example, my main characters of Brynn and Hunter can stay more YA style. It fits them. It always has. Minus the swearing by Brynn. My soldier character is definitely grimdark. He sees so much violence, commits violence and has a bleak outlook on life, wavering confidence in his honor. My villain was written to be more like a horror character, especially because he deals with the supernatural. Top it off, I changed the setting again, took the premise of my magic system from a separate WIP, changed some POVs, took out a YA character and gave her a complete separate story. Now I think I’m finally satisfied on where the story sits.

To put all that into perspective, none of this would have come about if I didn’t open myself up to other writers. I have 4 excellent CPs. One (Amanda) I met at the conference, and the other 3 (Claire, Lana, Dewey) via Twitter. What has really helped me the most is by reading their stories. Amanda writes YA fantasy about mermaids and Atlantis. Lana about Slavic mythology and witches (in YA first person no less). Dewey writes Middle Grade adventure/fantasy. And Claire does YA fantasy/sci-fi. Out of all four of them, Claire’s stories are the ones I would veer toward normally. And that is the beauty of having CPs. I’m getting a chance to broaden my horizons, read different types of stories and viewing them in a different mindset than just plan ole reading them. Working with CPs gives the opportunity to read someone else’s story, but also provide constructive feedback, in addition to receiving it. Seeing these other genres/stories has opened my eyes to what my own story is missing. The ideas just won’t stop. I even bring a critical eye to published authors works, see what they did, how it works. It has been amazing to have this transformation and it has really set me up for success that I didn’t have in the past.

Also, even if they don’t read this, I really just wanted to give a massive shout-out to Amanda, Claire, Lana, and Dewey! Thank you all!

Even though my goal for 2017 was to get on the path to publication, I think I can say I achieved it. Sure I haven’t scored an agent, but damn, they would’ve had a shitty story. I know that what I learned this year has set me up for success this coming year. My goal for 2018 is to land that agent. Without all the growth this year, I know it never would have happened.

Bring on 2018!

What I’ve Seen: Dark

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Dark, a ten episode Netflix Original Series from Germany.

Brief Summary:

In 2019 a man hangs himself, leaving his son a letter to not be opened until after a specific time and date. The son, after a few traumatizing months in the nuthouse, returns home and heads to school to meet his friends. The same week a boy goes missing. Oh, and this town lives in the shadows of a power plant. When the son and his friends go to the caves where the boy’s drugs are, the youngest of the group disappears. The families are fractured and the search for the missing children unfolds, not where, but when…

What works:

Aside from the obligatory Stranger Things missing boy & weird town vibe/comparison, what really makes Dark amazing is the cinematography and the camera work. This town is eerie as sin and everything within it is creepy. The drone shots of the forest and the cave that is the crux of the story is beautiful, but also dour. The music hits all the creep factors at the correct moments. The constant rain. The setting really is the outstanding character for this series.

That said, I loved the characters – all three timelines worth! (Get to that in a moment) These characters, kids to adults, are so layered, so broken, so normal, so beaten its amazing. There is so much drama, that I hated then loved characters from episode to episode. I yelled at them for their actions, like literally yelled at the screen. Sighed heavily at decisions. That is what makes great TV! Each actor was great, even the minor side characters. The casting was spot on and each actor/actress nailed their roles.

Sidenote, I watched the German version with subtitles, I would suggest doing the same. I personally hate dubs but I think you truly lose the heart of the story if you don’t have it in German.

Holy crap how amazing was the time-travel aspect of this show? I mean it was simply awesome! The fact the show was such a sllllllllloooooooooooooooow build really helped it. You have mysterious strangers knowing things, three timelines, missing children, murders. All across 66 years. Like serious cyclical events happening. It was just downright great, I don’t know how the writers kept their stuff together, but it was flawless. As a viewer, we didn’t know what the heck was going on, which made the mystery all that more gratifying to follow. Even all three timelines (2019, 1986, 1953) had their unique aesthetic to them, just great stuff all around.

One more note on the slow burn aspect. I know most people, especially in the current era, we want instant gratification. We expect to know things quickly. But I thought the slow burn approach to this story was the perfect route to take. When the man hanged himself and left the note, the viewer doesn’t know what’s in it until episode three. That made the mystery worth it. Then we learn the truth about the time-travel, wow. That wouldn’t work if it all happened in the first episode. The luster would have been worn off.

This part might turn off viewers, but I absolutely adored the ending. Even if Netflix doesn’t make a second season, I think the ending was perfect. It doesn’t matter if there are so many cliffhangers, I think that was the point. I want to know who Noah is, what’s with the chair, what he says to Bartosz, when did Jonas go, does Ulrich get back to 2019? Like those are all important questions left open, but the point of the story was the cyclical nature of time. Is there fate or predetermination? Can we change that? Those are the basic questions asked by the show. I think the ending left it open for viewer interpretation and that, in my humble opinion, is brilliant!

What doesn’t work:

Really the one thing that is a bit flawed about this show is the giant cast of characters. Since it is only ten episodes, some characters get lost in the shuffle and their plots are weak (aka older emo son and rebel daughter). The problem is with three timelines and all these characters at different ages, juggling all of them is hard to do. Yes, the show did a great casting job that it is easy to see the transition of who is who over the time periods (moles, destroyed ears, other character traits), but there are so many characters to remember that it can be tough. It never would work if it was a weekly regular TV show.

My only other qualm is there were times when characters kept secrets from others. So the cheating part of Ulrich’s plot was fine. The cop and her husband’s marriage due to the husband’s gay preferences was fine. Those secrets are great story-telling. But there were times when the cop and Ulrich had info that could help solve each other’s case but they danced around the subject and didn’t say what they knew. I get it for drama aspects, but after a few times, it grew annoying. Like just tell them!

Rating:

5 out of 5.

This show was fantastic. Every episode drew me further and further into this world and I didn’t want it to end. I can be happy with the ending if it stays this way. But I also want more! It was dark (intended), layered, genre-bending. I loved it, nothing more can be said about it.